50Hz 60Hz

Assume that when you changed the frequency from 50 to 60 Hz that you mean the rated frequency but you then ran the motor at the same speed. By doing this you have altered the motor set up calculations that could have changed two items giving a different resistance.

The first is that the slip speed would be different that gives different equivalent rotor resistance values when referred to the stator. The equation is actual rotor resistance / slip. The other is that the skin effect f ...

Why the frequency of power supplies in European and Asian countries is 50Hz, while American countries use 60Hz power supplies? What is the basic of the standard? What are the advantages and disadvantages of 50Hz and 60Hz power supply? In addition, why the airport and aircraft use 400Hz frequency?

In fact, there is no big difference between 50Hz and 60Hz, only the generator speed has slightly difference. Ch ...

Depending on your local electrical code, if you need a grounded (earthed) system, you can use a 400V-Delta to 208/120V WYE transformer to feed a variable frequency drive (VFD), and then set it a 60Hz to supply 208V 60Hz to the motor. Although I do not normally recommend it, if it is appropriate for you to run the system ungrounded (unearthed), then you can feed the VFD with through a 400V-Delta to 230V-Delta transformer and then supply the motor with 230V 60Hz power from the VFD. (As with mos ...

An established grid operating at a certain frequency (say 60 Hz) would have a certain inertia associated with this particular frequency. Given that it's possible to instantaneously drop the system frequency without losing sync, then, if we operate at a lower frequency, can we get some extra power injected to the system?

The grid standard for power quality dictates the frequency deviations allowable. Keep in mind that some electrical equipment are frequency sensitive. On the other h ...

While switch to "self-control", all of the output parameters are controlled by the frequency converter, at the moment, all external controls are inoperative;
Frequency converter PLC control switching
While switch to "external PLC control", the keyboard of the frequency converter is inoperative, all control commands are transmitted by external PLC, refer to following instru ...

Most generator designers use either IEC or NEMA as guidelines; the specific choice of which is applicable is often made by the end user (or at least the one purchasing the equipment). Both of these entities specify "normal" operation as falling within a set range of voltage, frequency, and a combination of both.

Normal operation occurs when ALL of the following are true.
(0.90 PU Volts < operating line voltage < 1.10 PU volts)
(0.95 PU Hertz < operating line freq ...

The normal frequency in Australia is 50 Hz and a client of mine runs his compressor motors up to 60 Hz which gives him greater output. But he only gets away with it because the machines are from the United States and are rated to operate at 60 Hz. Be careful because there could be a significant increase in power at the higher speeds in 60Hz.

Before you attempt to do this verify with the compressor motor manufacturer if you motor is VFD rate ...

Why voltage in some countries is 220V (208V, 230V, 240V) and 110V (100V, 120V) in some countries? Why can't we have the same Voltage and what are the Pros & Cons of using 110 V or 220 V in their Respective regions?

110V or 220V, Each system has its own advantages and disadvantages, so each country before designing a system Engineers sat down agreed on factors and concluded on which system to use taking in account:
Their ...

The people have described the single phase 120/240v system that is used in the USA, Canada, and Mexico, with the center-taped transformer. Japan uses a similar system but the voltage is lower: 100/200v. Most North America appliances work in Japan. Commercial and industrial systems in the USA run on three phase 208Y/120v or 480Y/277v. Canada uses higher voltage, typically 600/347v. These are all 60 Hz frequency.

Most of the rest of the world ...

The question was directed to single phase motor which it is surmised to be of induction type. Depending on the load characteristics, your motor could stall or overheat (or simply not start) if the frequency is not the one it was designed for at a given load. Three phase motor is not exactly the same as a single phase motor in speed-torque characteristics. Single phase motors are meticulously designed to have start-up torque through shaded pole or capacitor, etc. They can handle certain loads ...

Failure to balance the V/Hz ratio with 400V/50Hz motors in the US, to accommodate for the widely varying voltage levels in all of the sectional grids across the country results in significant starting torque and HP losses. Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) capable of full motor voltage/Hz/RPM/FLA levels are the very best option for use of these motor types.

The overall power grid across the US was created over 100 years ago, and though it has of course been expanded across the enti ...

If you have an electrical circuit consisting of a capacitor (capacitance C) and an inductive coil (inductance L) and you load the capacitor, you will observe a sin-wave oscillation in this circuit as soon as you remove the supply. Caused by the losses, the amplitude of the oscillation will decrease with every cycle. The frequency of the oscillation is the natural frequency of this circuit and is given by 2*π*f=1/sqrt(L*C).

If you connect a frequency variable supply (exciter) in ...

I require urgently 75 hp motor which should be compactible for both 50Hz/60Hz, I'm very much confused as frequency changes speed will change but I'm wondering how the power rating of the motor remain same in practical power must vary but manufacturer claims power remains constant? Is it possible? 75hp motor

A: It is possible for a motor to deliver the same power output at 50Hz ...

In very general terms the silicon-iron magnetic cores of motors, generators, and transformers get smaller as the frequency they operate at gets higher. This of course assuming the energy delivered at the output of both cases is the same. Because of this, when you have 50 Hz core in a motor, generator or transformer, this core will generally bigger and heavier (more silicon-iron). This is because it needs to have more magnetic mass in order to be able to accommodate the extra volume of magneti ...

The earliest proponent of alternating current (AC), Thomas Edison pushed direct current. If I remember my history right, 60Hz was a frequency that would produce no visible lamp flicker. There were (and still remain) 25Hz, 50Hz, 133Hz, & 400Hz power systems.

The initial investment in one frequency, early power generators (hydro i.e. low frequency) would have made sudden changes to be very costly. But some of the reasons are to do with lig ...

Electrical machines designed for 50Hz can usually work safely in 60Hz power supply, but not applicable to 60Hz machines to be run in 50Hz power supply. This is because impedance of 50Hz machines increases if operate in 60Hz supply which also lowers the running ampere, while if 60Hz machine run in 50Hz power system will experience increase in running ampere & overheating that will result to reduced life expectancy of the equipment. In motors coupled to water pumps or compressors increase o ...

Why not a 59 Hz? I prefer a prime number. If I were J.P. Morgan, I'd like to make Tesla have such a cool frequency. Or US yields to 55 Hz, and Germany get a 5 Hz bonus.
In the true world, a wide range of frequency for electrical machine could work economically, but in a real world, people make the standard, and 60 Hz simplified, e.g. the calculation. I guess Nikola Tesla had more common sense than I have. However, if I were born 100 years earlier ...

Q: Has anyone got experience in using a 50 Hz Alternator of about 20 MW, in a 60 Hz system country? What are the changes required in the alternator? Is it economical to carry out this change or one has to go in for a new alternator for 60 Hz only. There are lots of commercial requests for such usages of 50 Hz machine in 60 Hz locations and vice versa.

A: You can use a 50 Hz alternator in 60 Hz power system without changing the internals. The concern though, is the operational speed ...

If you operate a 3600 rpm (60 Hz) synchronous generator at 3000 rpm (50 Hz), the power output will be reduced, simply because the mass of the rotor remains constant and you reduce its rotational speed. Based on the laws of physics, kinetic energy is directly proportional to the mass and the square of the velocity. Conversely, if you operate a 3000 rpm (50 Hz) generator at 3600 rpm (60 Hz) the power output will ...

50Hz vs 60Hz in operating speed

The primary difference between 50 Hz (Hertz) and 60 Hz (Hertz) is, well, 60Hz is 20% higher in frequency. For a generator or induction motor pump (in simple terms) it means 1500/3000 RPM or 1800/3600 RPM (for 60Hz). Lower the frequency will be the iron losses and eddy current losses. Lower the frequency, speed of induction moto ...