Cable

To terminate three single core, 240 sqmm Al/XLP/AWA 33kV cables between two NXPLUS switchgear, as you can see in the attached picture, it has rubber sleeves at the cable entry, is it better to use brass glands instead, in order to keep the armor connected to earth, or this is not advisable?

The gland has two functions. It is to act as a transition point for the cable to allow it to remove the protective insulation and the second is to fix it so that in the event of a fault, it doe ...

Alternating current flowing in a conductor sets up an alternating magnetic field which is much stronger if the conductor is surrounded by an iron-rich material, for example if it is steel wire armoured or if it is installed in a steel conduit. The currents in a twin cable, or in two single core cables feeding a single load, will be the same. They will exert opposite magnetic effects which will almost cancel, so that virtually no magnetic flux is produced if they are both enclosed in the same ...

Many general contractors in many states here in the US were using aluminum wiring in housing and commercial structure construction in the 1970's, possibly later, maybe a bit earlier. I'm not sure if it's still the practice, but I hope not. There are problems with it, some of them realized after fires occurred. Wall plug sockets in the US use plated screw connections and/or compression/latching connections. The 'hot' lead connecting screw terminal is generally brass plated, and as such typical ...

Generally two factors will melt and damage the cable insulation:
1- Overheating due to excess current;
2- Insulation breakdown due to over voltage or voltage surges.

In the case of excitation system it should be noted that during field forcing the excitation current will exceed the nominal current, therefore you should review your system document to find the maximum current during field forcing or other current demand of the excitation system during the operation as for co ...

Cable selection is not just dependent on the load. There is also a requirement that the cable withstand all the short circuit current that the source might be able to deliver. It has to carry this large current, without significant damage, for the duration that it takes for the circuit protection to operate. This method applies to cables rated up to 600 volts phase to neutral (or 1kV phase to phase) and has some basis in IEC 60287.

The first step is to determine the maximum prospe ...

There are a lot of possible ways that a MV cable can fail. It all varies depending on the constructive type, and the topology of grid it's being used in. Both terminal boxes and the underground section can fail.

Terminals can fail if
1) subjected to moisture - high humidity of the air is enough to produce failure in time;
2) PILC cables naturally lose the oil and thus insulating properties from the terminal during years of service, because of its verti ...